20170902 Misty days of fall are starting

Dropping temperatures overnight are condensing the water vapour in wet air to give us morning mists and fogs.  Here are some examples…  (Click on the images to see them up close.)

Highway 607A on the way to Yesterday’s Resort …

Looking South from the Hwy 607 bridge over the Murdock River….

New pond at French River Bridge is stressing some of the trees, indicated by some premature fall colours….

Queen Anne’s Lace Blossom in the morning dew …

Water droplets have condensed on the spent blossoms of this Queen Anne’s Lace …

In a day or two the above flowerhead will retract into this ball for the seeds to mature …

Necklaces of dewdrops  …

It is always surprising to see the huge number and variety of cobwebs when looking up-sun on a foggy morning…

Last of the summer Ox Eye Daisys …

Last blossom on a Viper’s Bugloss..

 

Painted Ladies are still nectaring on the asters…

Probably a White-faced Meadowhawk or kin …

Andrew sent me this one a few days ago:  http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2017/09/storm-cell-over-polvadera-new-mexico.html

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20170831 End of August blooms, berries and bugs

Some local scenes as we approach the end of summer …

Bristly sarsaparilla is fruiting …

This looks like a potter or mason wasp  nectaring on a fall aster…

These mimics of Monarchs, Viceroy Butterflies are very busy in late summer…

That lateral line across both the fore and hind wings positively identifies this mimic.

No lateral line in this (female?) Monarch …

Probably a Cherry-faced, Ruby or White-faced Meadowhawk ….

Grasshopper hanging onto a Juniper twig …

Maturing tamarack cones …

Hoverfly zooming in on a Purple gerardia

Two different bluets …  see the Dragonfly Whisperer

 

Seed “cones” of tag alder …

 

White Admiral … The fine condition of this specimen probably means that this is a second generation.  It’s caterpillars will overwinter to metamorphose next spring …

Short antennae indicate that this is a Hoverfly of some sort …

Obviously this is a regrowth of an earlier fruiting body.  It is a form of heart rot, a fungus which attacks the inner core of mature trees.  Here’s more information about this northern tooth fungus (Climacodon septentrionale)  found on Shebeshekong Road.

Blue Sailors or Chicory…

Probably White-faced Meadowhawks …

 

Longhorned beetle in the grass near Poplar trees….

Milkweed Tussock Moth Caterpillar on its favorite plant …

Meadowsweet in the rain …

Prunus serotina, commonly called black cherry, wild black cherry, rum cherry, or mountain black cherry, can be distinguished from Prunus virginiana, commonly called bitter-berry, chokecherry, Virginia bird cherry and western chokecherry by its collar type attachment of its stem to its fruit.  It also has a much nicer taste…. as in black cherry frozen yoghurt.

We have busy times as the end of summer nears….

Our friends in the southern states had to alter their bird watching due to Hurricane Irma:

http://birdcast.info/forecast/hurricane-irmas-impact-on-birds/

 

20170824-25 Local bugs and blooms

Here is a sampling of what we’ve been seeing over the last few days …

This Viburnum cultivated variety was blooming in the foundation planting at Cottage Country Animal Clinic … the great folks who look after TinTin.

Notice the similarity with the flower heads of Highbush Cranberry and Northern Wild Raisin.

The spotted touch-me-nots are nearing the end of their blooming period….

Notice the huge amounts of pollen being carried by this orange belted bumble bee.  That is a big payload!

It appears that this predator, maybe a Great Black Wasp, is biting its prey.

EDIT 20171123:  Joe Campbell identified a wasp’s nest made by bald faced hornet.   I now believe that this is a bald faced hornet.  See my post 20171119 First heavy snow

After a few seconds this is all that is left of the prey, which drops to the ground …

The predator may be chewing on the remnants of its prey.  It then quickly buzzed off.

Whitefaced Meadowhawks continue to be abundant …

A brown grasshopper resting on some grass stems…

Leonard’s Skipper is sharing this flower with an unidentified critter …

Thistle bloom in front of its seedhead.

 

Second generation of Mourning Cloaks are flying about and foraging for sap and detritus…

It will hibernate over the winter, usually behind some bark, to emerge early next spring to mate and to start another cycle.

I just saw an article about Grasshoppers Molting:  https://naturallycuriouswithmaryholland.wordpress.com/2017/09/01/grasshoppers-molting/

If you go back to the previous post, you’ll see a couple edits about the position of Moon on the solar eclipse day.   Thanks Andrew.