20170609 Grackle, Chalk Fronted Dragonfly, Cinnamon Fern, Tamarck, Wild Calla, Common Yarrow, Pitcher Plant, Blanding’s Turtle, Tachinid fly.

Grackle, Chalk Fronted Dragonfly, Cinnamon Fern, Tamarck, Wild Calla, Common Yarrow, Pitcher Plant, Blanding’s Turtle, Tachinid fly.

Common Grackle preening …

Yellow Pond Lily with visitor …

Male Chalk Fronted Corporal

Unknown Odanate

Fern ID exercise

Hmmmm.  Nice little flower about a 2 cm in diameter, occurring in some damp roadside ditches ….

Three unknown Lepidoptera ….  If you can ID any of these unknowns please give us your thoughts by commenting.   Thanks.

EDIT:   I think that the above is not a butterfly but the Common Gray Moth aka Anavitrinella pampinaria.  (I’m still working on the two below!)

Tamarack cones are maturing …

Cinnamon fern

Calla palustris (bog arum, marsh calla, wild calla, and water-arum)

Common Yarrow are starting to blossom, providing nectar for visiting pollinators …

We went back to the site of the Pitcher Plants on Hwy 529 to find some visible “pitchers”.   All were hidden by dense tangles of grass, sedges, and various leaves.  I decided not to disturb any as they provided places for insects to drop into the “pitchers” thereby feeding the plants.   At this time of flowering they need all the nutrient they can get.

Species at Risk:  Blanding’s turtle.

Tachinid fly on first day of a blooming Ox Eye Daisy.

6 thoughts on “20170609 Grackle, Chalk Fronted Dragonfly, Cinnamon Fern, Tamarck, Wild Calla, Common Yarrow, Pitcher Plant, Blanding’s Turtle, Tachinid fly.

  1. I love your blog! Whenever I have an insect or plant that I cannot identify I turn to Dave’s Garden. They have wonderful discussion forums and you can submit photos for identification.

  2. All beautiful as usual Tom. You certainly have an eye for seeing things invisible to the rest of us. I didn’t know we had pitcher plants in Ontario. I thought they were native to Newfoundland.

    • Thanks, Pat.
      I have been driving past that pitcher plant spot for years. I only saw them the other day because I was enjoying the Labrador Tea and noticed their flowers appearing above the greenery. A good lesson about the use of attractive blooms by plants. ( I was also taking my time!)

      • I used to have great fun telling kids in school about these carnivorous plants, during my storytelling events. I included a pitcher plant in one of my stories.

      • Scary! Bug eating plants! We need more mosquito and black fly eating plants up here right away!

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