20170703 Part 3 of 3: Nature photography near Britt, Ontario

Photo:  Looking upstream from the patch of milkweeds at the bridge over the Naiscoot River on Hwy 529.

On July 3 I enjoyed a few hours with Sudbury Photographer and Author Ray Thoms checking out butterflies on Riverside Drive and, after lunch at St Amants, along Hwy 529.  We both made lots of pictures so I’ve decided to post three parts,  each with about 16 photos.  This is …

Part 3  Along Highway 529 to the bridge at Twin Rivers (Confluence of Naiscoot and Harris)

I was surprised to see this Dragonfly perched on a milkweed leaf.  As good a place as any, I suppose, to capture lunch …

With an Ox Eye Daisy in the background…

Another ground crab spider was seen here (in addition to the one in the patch at “Reno’s  Corner” in Part 1.)

The spider was moving very slowly.  A minute and a half elapsed between the first and last of this triplet of photos:

 

Is it protecting a cocoon?  Is it preparing to lay eggs.  Only a naturalist knows.  Not me.  I will have to do some research.

I think that this is one of the Crescents Nectaring on Spreading  Dogbane …

 

One of the Meadow Rues that has a purple blossom alongside the pond at Big Lake.

Nice reflection of a Fragrant White Water Lily in the pond across from Big Lake.

Our native   Heracleum maximum, cow parsnip  (also known as Indian celery, Indian rhubarb or pushki)  , source of nectar for many  pollinators, showing maturing seeds:

A long-legged spider in the milkweeds.  I wonder why it is there.

Rorschach Test:

 

A photojournal of an adventurous green leaf weevil….

UP:

ABOUT:

and DOWN:

 

The elegant pearl crescent:

 

The above is Part 3 of 3.

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20170703 Part 2 of 3: Nature photography near Britt, Ontario

Photo:  Looking upstream from the patch of milkweeds at the bridge over the Naiscoot River on Hwy 529.

On July 3 I enjoyed a few hours with Sudbury Photographer and Author Ray Thoms checking out butterflies on Riverside Drive and, after lunch at St Amants, along Hwy 529.  We both made lots of pictures so I’ve decided to post three parts,  each with about 16 photos.  This is …

Part 2  Along Riverside Rd and Hwy 529

Another male Monarch nectaring at the milkweed patch at “Reno’s Corner” on Riverside Road.

Great Spangled Frittilaries were also stopping by…

Possible a Crossline Skipper.   I am now resolved to spend more time with these difficult-to-identify butterflies — to try to get images of them in a variety of positions.

From Andy’s Northern Ontario WildflowersWinterberry Holly; deciduous, erect, holly shrub; are male and female shrubs; also known as Winterberry, Fever Bush,  Striped Alder, White Alder, Coralberry, Michigan Holly, False Alder, Inkberry, Black Alder Winterberry, Deciduous Winterberry, Virginian Winterberry, Brook Alder, Deciduous Holly, Possumhaw, Swamp Holly.

Starting to bloom now, First of July.

 

Yes!  “…. try to get images of them in a variety of positions”!

 

That black line aft of the eyes in deceiving.  The pale coloured legs confirm this as a Hummingbird Clear Moth  aka  Hymaris thysbe

After lunch, Ray and I went down “The Old 69 Highway from Pointe au Baril to Britt” — the current Hwy 529.

Early showing of the delightful harebells that grace our rocky outcrops…

European Skipper which is very abundant near old hayfields (because of the presence of Timothy.)

Early showing of Coreopsis at the junction of Hwy 529 and Hwy 645.

Flooded beaver dam on the east side of Hwy 529.

First time seen:  A white crab spider perched in a Viper’s Bugloss…

All four of these insects appear to be the same species.   I think that they are hoverflies.  But what kind??

They were very common nectaring on native  Cow Parsnip.

 

 

This shows the latex of the Common Milkweed.  The latex contains bitter poisonous chemicals (glycosides) that make  Monarchs unpleasant food (since they metamorphose from caterpillars that eat Milkweed leaves).   This process leads to the mimicry of the Viceroy butterfly.   Although I am not an experienced forager, I have tried pickled milkweed pods — which had an interesting texture.

 

Part 3 of 3 will continue along Hwy 529.

20170703 Part 1 of 3: Nature photography near Britt, Ontario

Photo:  Looking upstream from the patch of milkweeds at the bridge over the Naiscoot River on Hwy 529.

On July 3 I enjoyed a few hours with Sudbury Photographer and Author Ray Thoms checking out butterflies on Riverside Drive and, after lunch at St Amants, along Hwy 529.  We both made lots of pictures so I’ve decided to post three parts,  each with about 16 photos.  This is …

Part 1  Along Riverside Road

Although the lower beak looks yellow (due to the sun), I think that this is a  Song Sparrow serenading…

An older  Painted Lady, judging by her worn hind wings..

This well worn skipper might be a Northern Cloudywing

These Bombus spp like milkweed nectar also , and don’t seem to mind competition …

A male (see the “balls” on either side of the rear portion of the abdomen?) Monarch is nectaring on a Common Milkweed.

A Crab Spider  is doing something with that spun object (a cocoon?).   I spent some time with a Crab Spider in a similar situation and show it in a later Part of this 3 Part series.  The bumblebee isn’t interested.

A Monarch butterfly egg.  It usually hatches a day or two after being deposited.  There is some recent evidence that Monarchs display Trans-Generational Medication in Nature.   And here is an interesting story suggesting that Monarch cannibalism of eggs gave the evolutionary push for Monarch migration out of the Southern USA.

Painted lady sticking her tongue (proboscis) out.  My only photo of such a common event!

She is an old girl, enjoying her last days…

A skipper having a rest on a milkweed leaf…

Bumblebees like milkweed nectar …

A worn Skipper appears to put its proboscis over the TOP of one of its antenna (click to see up close)…

Thread waisted Wasp  seems to be nectaring …

Aha!   A female ? Nope!  You might have to click to see the “balls”  adjacent to the third (from the rear) dark abdominal band .

Unknown beetle on milkweed ….

Part 2  will continue with more photos along Riverside Rd and some along Hwy 529…